Find WiFi Password Of Connected Networks In Linux

Find WiFi Password Of Connected Networks In Linux

If you are using Linux and looking for methods to find WiFi passwords of connected networks in Linux-based operating systems then this blog is for you. There are multiple ways to find the WiFi password of connected networks in Linux.

How To Find WiFi Password Of Connected Networks In Linux

Method 1:

View Saved WiFi Password Of Connected Networks From Command line In Linux

In Ubuntu and derivatives, the wireless network configuration files are saved in the /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/ directory.

ls /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/
You will see an output with the password

Method 2:

How To Show Saved WiFi Password using Nmcli

Run the following command to find the list of available wireless network connections:

nmcli device wifi list

Now, Display the password of the currently connected WiFi network using the following command:

nmcli device wifi show-password

Find All Symbolic Links in Linux

Find All Symbolic Links in Linux

How do you find a soft link?

You can use the ls command. Some distributions show the links in a different color. The long listing is always reliable because it shows links with l.

lrwxrwxrwx 1 abhishek abhishek 14 Jan 31 18:07 my_link -> redirects.yaml

You can also use the tree command:

Find All Symbolic Links in Linux

This is okay if you have a couple of links in the current directory. But what if you want to see the links in a nested directory structure or the entire system?

In this tutorial, I will be showing you two ways to accomplish this mission:

  • Using the find command
  • Using the symlinks utility

So let’s start with the first one.

To find the symbolic links using the find command, you can use the following command syntax:

find Target_directory -type l

For example, here, I searched for available symbolic links inside the Links directory:

find Links/ -type l
Find All Symbolic Links in Linux

But by default, the find command will initiate the recursive search and if you want to limit the search to a certain depth, you will have to use the -maxdepth flag.

So let’s say I want to restrict the search to level 1 for the Links directory, I will be using the following:

find Links/ -maxdepth 1 -type l
Find All Symbolic Links in Linux

And if you want detailed output including the file permissions, user groups, etc. then you will have to pair the find command with -ls flag:

find Target_directory -type l -ls
Find All Symbolic Links in Linux

If you want a system-wide search, you can use / in the command.

This tool is what I used while pursuing my internship in networking.

But it does not come pre-installed though. You can install it using your distribution’s package manager. For Ubuntu/Debian, use:

sudo apt install symlinks

Once you are done with the installation, use the given command structure to look for available symbolic links:

symlinks -v target_directory
Find All Symbolic Links in Linux

Here, the -v option gives verbose output.

But by default, the symlinks utility won’t look into subdirectories. Enable recursive search with the -r option:

symlinks -vr target_directory
Find All Symbolic Links in Linux

The output has specific terms. Let me explain them.

  • relative indicates that links are relative to the current working directory in which the link resides.
  • other_fs means the link is indicating a different filesystem. In my case, it is indicated to the external drive.

Really, they might sound like a huge deal but we made sure to break the topic bit by bit.

Such as if you are a complete beginner, you can refer to the beginner’s guide to symbolic links:

How to Create Symbolic Links in Linux [Complete Guide]
This detailed tutorial tells you what are symbolic links, how to create a symbolic links and other important things associated with symlinks.
Find All Symbolic Links in Linux

And if you want to follow them to their origin, you can refer the following guide:

How to Follow Symbolic Links in Linux
You got a symbolic link and wondering about the actual source file? Here’s how to follow symlinks in Linux.
Find All Symbolic Links in Linux

I hope you will find this guide helpful. And if you have any queries or suggestions, be my guest in the comments section.

How to Find Open Ports and Close Them in Linux

How to Find Open Ports and Close Them in Linux

So you are dealing with a critical server where you have to maintain security at any cost. And closing ports to block unwanted traffic is the first step you’d take.

sudo ufw deny 80
sudo ufw enable

So this guide will explain how you can find and close open ports in your server.

Find open ports in Linux

In this tutorial, I am going to use the ss command to find open ports.

You can use the -l option with the ss command to get listening ports. But to be more specific, I’m going with -lt to get listening TCP ports:

ss -tl
How to Find Open Ports and Close Them in Linux

Similarly, if you want to have a list of both TCP and UDP in the listening state, you can use the given command:

ss -tul
How to Find Open Ports and Close Them in Linux

And to get the listening port of each service, you can use -n and for more fine-tuned results, you can always use the grep command:

ss -tuln | grep LISTEN
How to Find Open Ports and Close Them in Linux

Enough of finding open ports, let’s jump to how you can close them.

Close open ports in Linux

To close the port, first, you will need to stop the service and to find the service name, you can use the same ss command with -p option:

sudo ss -tulnp | grep LISTEN
How to Find Open Ports and Close Them in Linux

As you can see, the NGINX is utilizing port number 80. So let’s stop it using the given command:

sudo systemctl stop nginx

As it will enable itself on every boot and you can alter this behavior using the given command:

sudo systemctl disable nginx

For better results, I would recommend changing firewall rules.

Here, I’m going to block port no 80 (used by NGINX) in UFW (which is pre-installed in Ubuntu).

First, let’s check the status of UFW:

sudo ufw status
How to Find Open Ports and Close Them in Linux

And if it shows inactive, you can use the given command to enable it:

sudo ufw enable

Now, you just have to pair the deny option with the port number:

sudo ufw deny 80
How to Find Open Ports and Close Them in Linux

And here’s the end result:

How to Find Open Ports and Close Them in Linux

No sign of NGINX!

Wrapping Up

This was my take on how you can find and close open ports in Linux. I hope you will find this helpful.

And if you have any queries, let me know in the comments.

Using Find Command With Regex

Using Find Command With Regex

The find command is a powerhouse for searching files based on a number of criteria.

You can enable the beast mode in the find command by using regular expression (regex) for searching.

But before jumping to the examples part, it is crucial to know some basic regex tokens and syntax.

Quick Introduction to Regex Tokens

Tokens are nothing but special characters to search for specified patterns.

So let’s have a look at some of the most basic and widely used tokens which I’ll be using with the find command:

Token Description
Period (.) It gets you a match for any character once (except a new line). So a.b will match strings such as acb, aeb and abb but won’t match accb or ab
Backslash () It eliminates the effect of special characters such as the (.) will indicate to period effect but when used a.b it will only search for strings as a.b
Asterisk (*) It is known as a repeater symbol. This means the preceding character can be found 0 or more times. So the ca*t will find get you ct, cat, caat etc.
Square brackets ([]) It will get a positive result of any character used in a string inside the square brackets. This means a[bc]d will match abd or acd, but not the abcd.
Caret (^) Generally, it is sued to specify the starting point of search but can also be used to negate the content when used inside the square brackets [ ^ ]. Means a[^bc]d will get you aed, azd but not abd or acd.

Now, Let’s have a look at the basic syntax of using find with regex:

find [path] -regex [regular_expression]

Here,

  • [path] is where you want to search files.
  • regular_expression is where you will be using tokens to express the file pattern you are looking for.

Now it’s time for me to share some examples of how you can use find with regex.

Practical Examples of find command with regex

I am going to start with the most common scenario where a user only knows the first few characters of a file and wants to know where it is.

Search Files based on Initial Characters in the Current Directory

Currently, my file system looks like this:

Using Find Command With Regex

And I want to search for files that start with Fo or Fr so my command will be:

find ./ -type f -regex './F[or].*'
Using Find Command With Regex

Here, the -type f was used to search for files, ./ was used to look for files in the current directory and F[or] will show us file names starting from Fo and Fr.

But what if you want to execute some commands/programs over the given result? This can be done using the find command with exec:

Find Exec Command in Linux: 9 Useful Examples
Find works on searching files based on a number of criteria. The exec command gives you the ability to work on those results. Here are some examples of find exec command combination.
Using Find Command With Regex

Search Files in Sub Directory

The above example only applied to the current directory and did not show some files that followed the same naming pattern.

So I’ll be using the same naming pattern F[or] to find files in the subdirectory:

find ./ -type f -regex './[^/]*/F[or][^/]*'
Using Find Command With Regex

Seems too complex right? Let me break it down for you.

Here the [^/]*/ referees to the files that do not contain any back slashes which eliminates the possibility of finding files in the current directory.

And in the end, I’ve replaced period ( . ) with [^/] to not expand search than the first subdirectory by mentioning there should be no slashes after the filename.

Search Files through regex patterns in every Subdirectory

Seems quite complex after going searching in a single subdirectory right? Well, this is going to be the easiest one!

Well, two asterisks and that is it! Let me show you how:

find ./ -type f -regex '.*F[or].*'
Using Find Command With Regex

And if you are curious about how it worked, it’s because I used asterisks at the beginning and at the end so it went through every possibility.

Search Files based on Extension

First, let me share the general syntax of how you are supposed to search files based on their extensions:

find ./ -type f -regex ".*[fileextension]"

So let’s suppose I want to find all the text files (having a .txt extension) and that can be done quite easily by the given command:

find -regex -type f ".*.txt"
Using Find Command With Regex

Search Files based on Filename and Extension

This is my personal favorite implementation of regex with find as you can search files based on first letters and their extensions making it quite convenient.

First, let’s have a look at the syntax:

find ./ -type f -regex './[Filename].*.[extension]'

Let’s make it a bit practical. So I’m in a scenario where I only know the first few letters of the file (started with Fo or Fr) and its extension (.sh):

find ./ -type f -regex './F[or].*.sh'
Using Find Command With Regex

Final Words

From finding files modified in n minutes to executing scripts over results with exec, find is one of the most extensive commands offering over  50+ options.

This guide explained yet another way to use the find command making you one step advanced in your Linux journey.

While this guide was kept simple, if you still have any doubts, let me know in the comments.

Find Files by Name in Linux

Find Files by Name in Linux

Most often, you are looking for a file on Linux and you do not exactly know its true location on the system disk.

There are multiple ways to find files in the Linux command line. Most common and most reliable way is to use the find command.

The find command is extremely versatile and has way too many usages but here I’ll focus on finding files by their name.

I’ll explain how to use the ‘find’ command for:

  • Searching files using their name
  • Searching files with their exact name
  • Searching files for a particular pattern
  • Searching multiple files
  • Excluding certain files from the search results.

Besides these, I’ll also show how to use the grep command with the output from the find command. Let’s first start with an overview of the find command.

The utility ‘find’ looks for files that match a certain set of parameters like the file’s name, its modification date, its extension, etc. It has the following format:

find path pattern

If a path is not specified, it searches in the current directory and its sub-directories.

Searching for Files Using their Name

Looking for a file with its name is a commonly used operation with the find command. The -iname option looks for a file regardless of its case.

For example, suppose you have two files abc.txt and ABC.txt. Both of them have the same name but different cases. Using the find command, you get both files in the results:

find -iname abc.txt
Find Files by Name in Linux
Find files with their name while ignoring the case

Searching for Files Using their Exact Name

The -name option is case-sensitive in contrast to the -iname option, so you are going to get files with the exact name.

For example, let us look for a file with the name abc.txt :

find -name abc.txt
Find Files by Name in Linux

The name of the file can be composed of wildcards as you will see later in this guide.

Searching for Files With a Particular Pattern

You can also filter files that follow a given pattern. For that, you can use wildcards.

Say, for instance, you are looking for all the configuration files on your system that end with the ‘.conf’ extension:

find /etc -type f -name "*.conf" | grep client.conf
Find Files by Name in Linux
Find files with a certain extension

In the same way, you can also search for files with the same name but with any extension of three characters as:

find ~ -name "abc.???" 
Find Files by Name in Linux
Find files with the same name but any extension

If you have several file names that contain a common string, say ‘VM’, the find command in this scenario will be as:

find -name '*VM*' 
Find Files by Name in Linux
Find files with a matching pattern

So far we have used a single directory (the home directory) with the ‘find’ command.

You can also search in multiple directories by specifying them on the CLI:

find ~/Desktop/example1/ ~/Desktop/example2/ -name 'abc*.*'
Find Files by Name in Linux
Find files in multiple directories

Searching for Multiple Files and Multiple Patterns

Suppose you want to find multiple files in a directory having .msi and .txt as file types.

Here you need to use both the name and type options on the CLI as:

find -type f ( -name "*.txt" -o -name "*.msi" )
Find Files by Name in Linux
Search for multiple files and multiple patterns

In a similar approach, you can extend the above command for more files by using extra -o options.

Excluding Certain Files from the Search Results

The find command can also exclude certain types of files from the search result:

find -name '*abc*' -type f ( ! -name '*.msi' )
Find Files by Name in Linux
Exclude certain files from find search results

Here, the ‘find’ command will look for all the files having ‘abc’ string in their name. However, it will filter out the .msi type of files.

Other Common Examples of the ‘find’ Command

You have more options that can be used with the ‘find’ command. Let me share a few such examples:

System reporting low disk space? Find bigger files like this:

find -size +2000M

Using the above command, you can find files occupying more than 2000 Megabytes of space.

In case you need to save your findings for later investigation, redirect it to a file:

find -name '*abc*' -type f ( ! -name '*.msi' ) > mysearch.txt
Find Files by Name in Linux
Save the result of the find command

The type option with the find command opens many opportunities.

You can combine it with different file descriptors for different types of files. For example, ‘f’ for a regular file, ‘d’ for a directory, ‘l’ for a symbolic link, etc.

find /var/log -type f -name "*.log" 

Conclusion

In this guide, I explained how to search for files by their names using the find command. You saw multiple ways to narrow down the search path and most importantly, how to incorporate the ‘wildcards’ for pattern searching.

There are many more uses of the find command. Like you can use it to find recently modified files. Here are a few more common examples if you are interested.

15 Super Useful Examples of Find Command in Linux
Learn the super powerful and super useful find command with these practical examples.
Find Files by Name in Linux

You can always search man pages to get extensive insights into the various options with the ‘find’ command.

How To Find Your Lost AirPod Case In 1 Minutes [2022]

How To Find Your Lost AirPod Case [2022]
AirPods will be virtually useless without an AirPods case as you need it to charge your AirPods, you also need it to reset and pair your AirPods. Meanwhile, You need to panic as in this post, we are going to show you the steps to find your lost Airpods in a very short time.

How To Find Your Lost AirPod Case Quickly

There can multiple situations when you lost your AirPod Case. Let’s go through them one by one.

Situation 1:

You lost your AirPods Case with your Airpods on it. So the biggest question is can we track a lost AirPod Case?

Can You Track A Lost AirPod Case?

Yes, you can track a lost AirPod case in one condition and that is you need to have at least one AirPod in your AirPods case otherwise it is impossible to track your AirPod case. If you are AirPods case has at least one of your AirPods in your lost charging case then you can track it using Apple’s Find My App.

  • Open the Find My app on your iPhone.
  • Select the Devices tab at the bottom.
  • Select your AirPods.
  • Now tap “Play Sound.”
  • Your AirPods will begin chirping and you can find the case by following the sounds of the chirps until you find them. ( Your AirPods case should be open in this situation other you can’t do anything)

How to find your AirPods without an iPhone

  • You need to browse www.icloud.com from an internet browser.
  • Log in with your Apple ID.
  • Select Find iPhone.
  • Now you need to select your AirPods from the drop-down menu that says All Devices at the top of the screen.

How much does it cost to replace AirPods?

Visit this dedicated AirPods support page to know the cost of repairs or the replacement of AirPods.

How Can You Tell if a Cryptocurrency is Legitimate? Read Our Guide To Find Out

How Can You Tell Which Crypto Coins are Legit?

In recent years, the cryptocurrency industry has seen an explosion in popularity. Due in part to the pandemic, when people took the time they had stuck at home to evaluate their finances and explore investment opportunities, the sector has seen unprecedented growth which looks set to continue.

Despite this, cryptocurrencies remain volatile, with even the big hitters like Bitcoin seeing wild spikes in value over short periods of time. With new crypto coins appearing at a near daily rate, and an at times overwhelming volume of information and new technology out there, it’s important to know what you’re doing when looking to invest in a digital currency. We’ve put together a guide so that, whether you’re purchasing Bitcoin or about to buy Tether, you know you’re making a secure and sensible decision.  

 

Watch out for Pump and Dumps

Pump and dumps are one of the most common scams seen in the cryptocurrency sector, they were used to fleece over $2.8bn from unsuspecting investors in 2021. The way these scams work is fairly simple, but they can be devastatingly effective. Fraudsters take an unknown, low value coin and launch a concentrated, aggressive marketing and PR campaign to generate hype and excitement around the currency. Once enough investors have been secured and the coin’s price has inflated significantly, the scammers rapidly sell their holdings and make off with the profits before the coin’s price inevitably plummets.

To avoid falling victim to a pump and dump scam, research any coin thoroughly before making an investment. Currencies with vague or undisclosed backers should be avoided, while resisting the urge to jump on emerging trends can help you steer clear of being duped. Watch out for previously unknown coins that are suddenly subject to extensive social media attention and skyrocketing values – these are the hallmarks of a pump and dump scheme.

 

Pay Attention to Marketing Campaigns

Marketing plays a big part in the cryptocurrency industry. It’s how developers spread the word about their new projects, attract interest, and secure investors. However, the way in which these marketing campaigns are implemented can give you an indication as to a coin’s potential legitimacy, and learning how to spot the signs of illicit activity can save you from dire financial consequences.  

Genuine companies will use their social media platforms to present educational and informative content. Developers will be keen to demonstrate the technological benefits that their coin offers, with attempts made to generate organic social media growth and awareness.

On the other hand, fraudulent coins may have over the top social media campaigns, with outlandish claims made about the financial returns involved if you were to invest, and little-to-no attention paid to the technology or development process behind the currency itself.

 

Join the Community

The crypto world is a digital world, with enormous online communities dedicated to discussing the latest and best cryptocurrency news and developments. There is a wealth of information to be gleaned from these communities, getting involved and immersing yourself in crypto culture is one of the best ways to educate yourself as you embark on your crypto journey.

While forums and social media platforms will have countless groups for the broader cryptocurrency industry, most legitimate coins will have dedicated social communities themselves. Usually based on social chat apps like Discord, these communities will discuss the coin and its technology, with developers often contributing to offer updates and answer questions.

Before making an investment into a digital currency, spend some time in the coin’s community and watch out for potential red flags. Vague or absent input from developers can be a bad sign, while coins with no community at all should be avoided altogether.

 

Check the Whitepaper

A whitepaper is the founding document for any cryptocurrency or initial coin offering (ICO) and is one of the most crucial factors in a currency’s success. In it, potential investors should be able to learn about the company’s history, objectives, and the technical specifications, goals, and proposed timelines of the coin itself. Legitimate cryptocoins often provide supplementary documents alongside their whitepaper, including further technical information and legal information on the company and its business practices.

Watch out for whitepapers that are scant in detail or poorly conceived, while whitepapers full of promise of substantial financial return or the revolutionary, unrealistic technological benefits of their coin are often indicative of fraud. Cryptocurrencies with no whitepaper should always be avoided.

 

Conclusion

Making the decision to take the plunge and begin investing in digital currencies can be a simultaneously exhilarating and nerve-wracking experience. Conflicting stories of overnight wealth and financial ruin work to inspire hope and dread all at once, while the sometimes intelligible technical newspeak and industry jargon can overwhelm even the quickest of learners.

New, burgeoning industries are often awash with scammers and rogue traders, looking to cash in on the naivety and lack of awareness seen in some newcomers to the industry. It can be difficult to know what to look out for to avoid potential scams, but with this guide you should be able to stop the warning signs of a fraudulent operator and ensure you’re investing in legitimacy. 

 

The post How Can You Tell if a Cryptocurrency is Legitimate? Read Our Guide To Find Out appeared first on IT Security Guru.

Find Files Modified in Last N Minutes in Linux

Find Files Modified in Last N Minutes in Linux

Finding recently modified files is a helpful parameter when troubleshooting your code or server.

What log files were modified? What files changed when I ran this command? The versatile find command can help you get the answers.

The command below will find all the files that have been modified in the last five minutes in the current directory.

find . -type f -mmin -5

That’s just one example. Let me share how you can list files that are accessed and created in the last n minutes/days in detail.

Finding modified files in Linux

Before jumping to the explanatory part, first, I’d like to share the syntax of how you can use the find command to find files that are modified at the last n minute.

find [path] -type f -mmin n

Here, n indicates how many minutes you want to check for. But you also have some options such as:

  • -n will check for files modified in less than n minutes
  • +n will check for files modified in more than n minutes
  • n will check for files modified exactly n minutes ago

Similarly, you can also use -mtime instead of -mmin to check for files modified days ago.

Finding files modified in the last 5 minutes

So let’s suppose I want to list find files that are just modified in the last 5 minutes in the var directory; my command will be as follows:

find .var/ -type f -mmin -5
Find Files Modified in Last N Minutes in Linux
Finding modified files in the last 5 minutes

As you can see, it just throws files, and I don’t find the given list useful and readable.

In this case, I’ll append -ls to have a much cleaner look and more info such as the file owner, permissions, and modification time.

find .var/ -type f -mmin -5 -ls
Find Files Modified in Last N Minutes in Linux
Using -ls for better visibility
💡
The find command allows a few actions on its result. The -ls is one of such actions. You don’t necessarily need to use find-exac or xargs for the ls command.

Finding files modified in the last n days

To find modified files in the last n days instead of n minutes, you just have to use -mtime instead of -mmin.

Suppose I want to find files that have been modified in the last one day, my command would be:

find /media/sagar/HDD/Downloads -type f -mtime -1 -ls
Find Files Modified in Last N Minutes in Linux
Finding files modified on the last one day

Find files older than X days

You can use the mtime parameter to find older files that have not been modified recently.

Let’s say you want to find files older than 30 days in the current directory. Use this command:

find . -mtime +30

Find modified directories in the last n minutes or days

The find command can also bring a list of modified directories.

Just change -type f with -type d, which will let you search for directories instead of files.

For demonstration, I’ll be showing how you can get the list of modified directories under /.cache/mozilla/firefox:

find .cache/mozilla/firefox/ -type d -mmin -5 -ls
Find Files Modified in Last N Minutes in Linux
Listing directories that are modified in the last 5 minutes

Similarly, you can find directories on which you worked a few days ago.

find Downloads/ -type d -mtime -1 -ls
Find Files Modified in Last N Minutes in Linux
Finding modified directories on the last 1 day

Finding files that have been recently accessed or created

So how about finding files that were accessed or created last n minutes?

To find files that were accessed in the last n minutes, you’ll have to use -amin instead of -mmin.

To find files that were accessed in the last 5 minutes inside my preferred directory, I’d be using the given command:

find /media/sagar/HDD/Downloads -type f -amin -5 -ls
Find Files Modified in Last N Minutes in Linux
Find files accessed in the last 5 minutes

In the same way, you can also find files created in the last n minutes by using -cmin instead of -amin.

find /media/sagar/HDD/Downloads -type f -cmin -5 -ls
Find Files Modified in Last N Minutes in Linux
Finding files created in the last 5 minutes

Conclusion

Basically, there is no limit to the use cases. You can modify it from -n to +n and you can search for older files. Use the ctime and you can get recently created or ancient files.

Learning the basics allows you to use the find command as per your need. I believe this tutorial gave you enough understanding of using the time parameter of thefind command.

Over 8000 VNC instances left exposed, researchers find

Researchers have discovered 8000 exposed Virtual Network Computing instances, which could put numerous global organisations at risk of remote compromise. As a matter of fact, the instances were managed by critical infrastructure (CNI) organisations, who are responsible for water treatment plants, manufacturing plants and research facilities.

With disabled authentication, malicious actors have the ability to hijack certain endpoints and with it, the industrial control systems these may be connected to. This is because VNC is a cross-platform screen-sharing system, which allows users to remotely control another computer.

Etay Maor, Senior Director of Security Strategy at Cato Networks, comments; “VNCs are fundamentally appliances and each appliance needs to be carefully maintained, upgraded, and patched. It’s the same problem IT has long faced. Moving to a cloud-native SASE service allows critical infrastructure organisations to protect the infrastructure without compromising service delivery. They can apply virtual patches protecting internal infrastructure without having to actually update that infrastructure.”

The researchers warned that exposed VNC deployments could be exploited by malicious actors to sabotage, as well as to steal data, extort their victims and deploy ransomware. As such, all firms running VNC should work to immediately improve their security awareness training, review their access policies and ensure that appropriate firewalls are in place. Most importantly, all devices must be patched and continuously monitored in order to avoid falling victim to this particular attack.

The post Over 8000 VNC instances left exposed, researchers find appeared first on IT Security Guru.

Find Your Way to a Strong SysAdmin Team

It’s tough sourcing enough talent today to meet growing IT team needs, but life finds a way. Our recent 10th Annual Open Source Jobs Report found 93% of employers are struggling to find enough employees with open source skills. It doesn’t help that 73% of professionals feel it would be easy to find another job, and they are demanding higher salaries than ever before to stay put. Between an overwhelming talent shortage and competition from other employers, many companies’ IT teams are at risk of “going extinct”.

93% of employers are struggling to find enough employees with open source skills.

There is a way to address this situation however. The Open Source Jobs Report  also found:

74% of professionals are asking for more training opportunities so they can keep up with current technologies
62% said training is the thing their employer can provide that would help them be more successful, a higher percentage than any other option
81% of professionals want to add new certifications to their resumes this year
90% of employers are willing to help them pay for them

Companies need to keep up by providing formal training and certification opportunities to their employees or risk giving them one more reason to leave.

62% said training is the thing their employer can provide that would help them be more successful, a higher percentage than any other option.

It should be kept in mind that providing training and certifications not only makes employees happier by demonstrating an employer’s willingness to invest in them and their career opportunities, but these opportunities also benefiSavet the employer. Having a better skilled team means you will be more successful in achieving your technology goals, and having more certified professionals on staff means your customers can have more confidence in your teams’ abilities.

Providing training and certifications not only makes employees happier by demonstrating an employer’s willingness to invest in them and their career opportunities, but these opportunities also benefit the employer.

Linux Foundation Training & Certification offers a wide catalog of training and certification in the most important open source technologies, from cloud to system administration to networking, blockchain, web development and more. This SysAdmin Day, give your team what they really want and provide them with training and/or certification that will help both you and them achieve your goals. We provide group classes, team discounts and more to help you be successful when it comes to upskilling. Learn more and contact us here.

The post Find Your Way to a Strong SysAdmin Team appeared first on Linux Foundation.

The post Find Your Way to a Strong SysAdmin Team appeared first on Linux.com.